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20121121
20121129
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affect the pentagon. he spoke tuesday evening at the center for new american security about the so-called fiscal cliff and defense priorities. [applause] good evening and thank you for coming. >> it is an honor to be introducing my old boss. >> defense secretary leon panetta looks at how budget cuts could affect the pentagon. we spoke tuesday evening at the center for new american security about the fiscal cliff and fed priorities. >> thank you for coming. it is an honor to be back and an honor to be introducing my old boss. as you know, secretary of the net debt is one of the most respected and experienced hands in washington. his resume is legendary. chairman of the budget committee back in the day when they actually passed a budget, director of the office of management and budget, and chief of staff to president clinton when the white house, director of the central intelligence agency, and now secretary of defense, so the question is what in the world are you going to do next. this extraordinary resume does not do justice to the man. leon panetta is a wonderful human being and i
john allen has return to afghanistan to exhume his duties more than a week after the pentagon says it is investigating him for what he -- what they call an appropriate occasions with a woman linked to the david petraeus scandal. general allan was expected to testify before a senate committee last thursday on his nomination to become the commander of u.s.-european command and the top nato general. that nomination has been put on hold. finally, president obama pardons' the national thanksgiving turkey this afternoon at a white house ceremony. the tradition started back in 1963 with president john kennedy. those are some of the latest headlines on cspan radio. [video clip] the name of this place still resonates with the shuddering in the hearts of the american people. more than any other name connected to the civil war except lincoln's, a gettysburg reverberates and americans retain knowledge that what happened here was the crux of our terrible national trial and even americans who were not sure what precisely transpired on the skills know the glory and all the tragedy we associate wi
the sequestered . but did so by impacted the pentagon less heavily than the sequestered it. but divided government, i think you get the question. president said he does not want to change the money for the pentagon. mitch mcconnell said we are not raising taxes to ransom the pentagon budget cuts. a lot of focus has been on the pentagon but these are more concerned about the $50 billion in domestic discretionary spending restraint every year. you did to the republican study committee. the announced all a thing worse than sequestration would not be having savings. this stampede attempted did not take. he denied a demand that the defense budget be remain untouched, either of the public opinion or the house. i think sequestration happens. the only thing i could imagine is if they -- the r's and d's would both rather take it out of entitlements rather than the annual budgets. could they cut a deal where they save the same amount of money but out of entitlements? that is the only compromise i could see. then you get to the grand bargain idea. it seems every time i have these conversations were people as
displayed on hunting down osama bin laden. he often holds meetings in his pentagon office with his dog curled up around his feet as he is pressing a commander on how a war plan is going to advance or how they are going to make more progress. when traveling, who he is known to hang out in the back of the plan with staff and journalists and waxing eloquent about what it is like growing up as an italian american first generation american on a walnut farm outside monterey. hours earlier he had been to all businesses delivering tough talking points on behalf of the president. he is known for his colorful language when talking and often for getting the press corps hangs on every four-letter word. he is also known for the passion with which he pursues the stewardship of his job, whether it is seeking to end sexual assault in the military or ensuring our officers are trained to hold the highest standards. he cares deeply and genuinely about men and women in uniform, and their families, their sacrifice, about wounded war years, our veterans. he has an easy laugh, but as he would say, he is seri
as the pentagon. we ought to be thinking of that in terms of our values and our future. let me speak to a couple of elements here that i think progressives should keep in mind. progressives cannot afford to stand on the sidelines in this fiscal cliff debate. important critical decisions will be made soon that will affect this country for 10 years. i think we need to be a part of this conversation. we need to be open to some topics and some issues that are painful and hard for us to talk about. we cannot stand by the sidelines in denial that this is ever going to engage us in the things we value. we cannot be so naive to believe that just taxing the rich will solve our problems. i believe that is an important part of a solution. we have to look to reform and change that is significant, that preserves many of the values and programs that brought us political life, and we cannot believe that merely ignoring these programs or not engaging will solve the problem. pick up any of the newspapers and look for the full-page ads and you will see on a daily basis organizations that we respect and are engage
there and 100,000 u.s. paid contractors paid by the pentagon still occupying afghanistan. the one change we have seen this year has been the withdrawal of the troops from iraq. that was the centerpiece from where u.s. troops were fighting around the world. now, we're looking at afghanistan as the biggest war zone that is acknowledged. the interesting thing that makes it difficult for people like you and i who want to look at where the u.s. troops are, the lists that we see are a very hard to actually get good information. i was looking yesterday at a few different lists on the pentagon's web sites. one of them is a list of personnel where are u.s. shoulders are. there are about 195,000 u.s. soldiers and marines that are based around the world. we hear in general they are in about 150 countries. when you look at the list, there is only about 40 countries listed. why is that? we are only listing the countries where there is more than 100 troops permanently based there. that is kind of weird because that means is only about 1/4 of the country -- about 1/5 of the countries where we have troops are m
of strategy, yes, it's essential, important, including for the first time two years ago, the pentagon had a conference i was there in which we discussed india and american cooperation in the pacific. never happened before. it does not mean [indiscernible] we are taking positions which are corporative, dynamic, and which recognize that nation's change. people change. we have to keep abreast of changing conditions, if you like. >> i want to pose one last thing. i look today to see how much china held in u.s. treasurys serves about 1.55 trilion. -- $1.55 trillion. we often talk about power in a classical sense, but there is no doubt economies matter. whether it has been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on the economic dynamism of the country -- i do not know canada's net account with china, but it raises the fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or liability. the conference yesterday or recently in davos for someone made the comment that it is the size of the pentagon and the size of american that there were too big to fail and those debt holder
. he would absorb it and then convey to the pentagon what he just heard and they would run around and fix it. >> as a brigadier general he's a long way from the four-star that runs the air force. >> right. >> and then he referred so sylvester, arthur sylvester, the former secretary of defense for public affairs who said the government has a right to lie. do you remember that? >> i don't. i don't remember that. i mean, i remember his name on a lot of the tapes, but i don't remember that particular -- >> he was a newspaper man from, i believe, newark. >> hu, hu. >> and -- what is your sense, after listening to the tapes, of how well president kennedy knew the people that he had around? what was his relationship with? >> well, really very well. and throughout the major crises of the cuban missile crisis and the civil rights crisis you get the sense that he's very comfortable with his aides. and one feeling i now have from this book project is that democrats like a different kind of a meeting than republicans. republicans like a tightly orgd hierarchical meeting. democrats like a loos
and shaped by general jones who has unique experience of serving in the pentagon and in the military and as the national security adviser to the president. he made a point that i was familiar with based on my experiences, that we had all these different agencies and departments and people all over the government as well as in the congress that had parts of the energy package but it never had a way to be brought together to take a look at what should be our energy policy and came up with this idea of the council which we are recommending where you pull all of the different departments chaired by the department of energy secretary, agencies, that will reach out to all the different interested parties to make sure their views are being taken into consideration. to do this quadrennial agency review somewhat similar to what they have done at the pentagon. it is very different from what they do at the pentagon. it is a technique that i have observed that works and is helpful for the department of the defense. talking about a strategy, a broader view, and then through the report get into th
at how budget cuts could affect the pentagon. he spoke of the center for a new american security about the so- called fiscal quick and defense priorities. >> his resume is what i will call legendary. democratic senator. chairman of the house budget committee when they actually passed budgets. director of office of management and budget, and chief of staff to president clinton and white house. now, secretary of defense. the question, what in the world will you do next? this does not do justice to the man. he is a wonderful human being with many different facets, and in some ways, a man of contrast. i will give you a couple of examples. he is known for his warm, italian bear hugs. he is also known around the world for the laser like focus he displayed in hunting down osama bin laden. he often holds meetings in his pentagon office with his dog curled up around his feet as he vigorously presses a particular war plan will it be of particular interest. when traveling he is known to hang out in the back of the plane with staff and journalists. with a scotch on the rocks in hand. and waxing el
brought all these cases to the attention of the pentagon. the secretary of the army responded with an assurance that our flag would be flown at army installations whenever the flags of the states are on display. and many of the individual installations i mentioned took corrective action when i contacted them. but despite this response, i continue to receive reports of situations where territorial flags are forgotten. see, the problem is there is no uniform regulation governing the inclusion of the flags of the district of columbia and the territories, though the secretary -- army secretary said it is the policy of the air force, the coast guards, the marines and the navy to let local commanders have the discretion to display state flags. with or without the flags of the territories on their installations. i have requested that the service modify their regulations to include our flags but no action has been taken. and i believe it should not be at the discretion of individual base commanders to decide to exclude any part of the united states. or the fighting men and women from
in the future. host: what would the pentagon cut if sequestration happen? guest: 9.4% cut, so it is on the order of $500 billion a little bit more. about half over all, over 10- year cuts in spending. it is a significant cut. host: going back to what we started with, they have not said specifically what they were looking at or bay -- have given the public some idea? guest: they said, first of all, but would be almost, but -- unavoidable to have furloughs. certainly contracts spending would be cut. the president had an option to exempt troops, the impact on their pay and he indicated he would exercise the option if that happens, so that would not be on the table. but there would definitely be cuts in weapons systems, contract and, and civilian furloughs. host: burlington, north carolina. republican caller. caller: i think we all have to agree -- in a sense that we are all in agreement -- that something needs to happen. but we already have the tools in place. we have bowles-simpson, which was an idea. the fear is that nothing is going to get done until january. there was little to no talk about cu
other countries -- i understand that. but the idea of the state department, it was actually the pentagon last week, a woman said i had my first kid -- i saved up my vacation and sick days and used them all up. even in the federal government, we need paid leave. i think beyond that, high- quality accessible daycare. i do not understand why that is not much more of a political issue than it is. those will in fact all women -- most of us in the room can manage without the last one. we can buy it or find it, but it ought to be far more general and accessible for those who cannot afford it. those issues cover the waterfront. there are other issues that do not. the kind of flexibility i am talking about will be very helpful for women who have a shot at leadership positions and might allow women to stay in the game so that when you have kids and need to do work differently you do not give up on the career you trained for and educated for and started for and are still eligible for leadership down the road. flexibility for people at the bottom of the chain can mean something really different -- i
the sequester, that's good, less spending. i'm in favor of looking at the pentagon spending and reforming how you get it and get the same amount of dollars. look at the government spending. >> not a common republican position. >> more common than you think, but it's not common in the appropriations committee that does armed services. i talked to one of the key guys over there and said how can i help you reform the pentagon? there must have been -- >> i bet congressmen love getting that call, grover norquist, how can i help? >> i start meetings that way. want to make the government more efficient, make it cost less and we are everybody's friend on that subject. ralph nader and i were lobbying the bush administration back in 2001. >> what about the second cliff, the bush tax cuts? >> i think -- you get towards the end in a thing and if the republicans have played it right, they said look, push it out a month or two weeks so you should never actually go over these things, just as you do with continuing resolutions. say, look, give it a week, two months. >> the president is not going to extend. h
understand that. but the idea of the state department, it was actually the pentagon last week, a woman said i had my first kid -- i saved up my vacation and sick days and used them all up. even in the federal government, we need paid leave. i think beyond that, high- quality accessible daycare. i do not understand why that is not much more of a political issue than it is. those will in fact all women -- most of us in the room can manage without the last one. we can buy it or find it, but it ought to be far more general and accessible for those who cannot afford it. those issues cover the waterfront. there are other issues that do not. the kind of flexibility i am talking about will be very helpful for women who have a shot at leadership positions and might allow women to stay in the game so that when you have kids and need to do work differently you do not give up on the career you trained for and educated for and started for and are still eligible for leadership down the road. flexibility for people at the bottom of the chain can mean something really different -- it can mean you work 15 or
people think the source of american power is, they say the pentagon or the size of the federal debt. if you are the biggest debtor in the world, it gives you a certain power. are you optimistic these can be reversed? >> i am very optimistic about america's future. i think we have to get our house right, but we have to be prepared to engage with confidence abroad. we still are the shining light on the hill people look to. they are disappointed when we do not deliver. we are disappointed when we do not deliver. i think we can find a way to move forward. it is not going to be simple. our government takes longer to get things done than the real economy would like. and we have got to intersect the real and political economy, but i am optimistic we can make progress. >> thank you so much. >> i am like dr. doom. i come on stage. >> next, the medal of honor winners talk about their lives and experiences. that is followed by a look at the lives of teenagers in the white house. at 8 eastern, tom brokaw moderates a discussion on the treatment of returning veterans. joining him are colin powell
has not decided on anything. he will evaluate proposals from the pentagon and elsewhere on what we might negotiate with the afghan government on a future presence in afghanistan procter we fulfill our commitments to end the war in afghanistan in 2014. that commitment and that presents would be very in scope as we talk about counterterrorism operations and the training of afghan forces. >> last one hour. the meeting with business leaders today, they're making progress on that front? >> the president did not have a meeting with business leaders today. tom donahue and others had a separate meeting with some senior people over here. jack lew and others. that's far the process we are engaged in that i described earlier, an ongoing conversation with leaders on capitol hill, rank-and-file, staff, others, business leaders large and small as well as civic, labor, other leaders will have a stake in this very important debate. >> is expected to meet with other stakeholders to date? >> not unaware of. >> you said you came out here to say that the president had spoken to the speaker and senate
people what they think the source of american power is, the either side pentagon or the size of the federal debt. if you're the biggest debtor in the world, it gives research and power. are you optimistic that these can be reversed? 30 seconds. >> some very optimistic about america's future. we have to approach that future with confidence. we have to get our house right, but we have to be prepared to engage with confidence abroad. we are still that shine a light on the hill that people look to. they are disappointed when we don't deliver. we're disappointed when we don't deliver. i think we can, both at home and abroad, find a way. it will not be simple. our government takes longer to get things done than a real economy would like. of the end of the day, i am optimistic. >> . q.. -- thank you. they care so much. steve case, michael porter, robert kimmitt, douglas holtz- eakin. host: caller: -- [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] price talking about the so- called fiscal cliff and what the unions have
that is given, by getting rid of outdated weapons programs. the pentagon keeps telling washington, stop appropriating money for this. they are not asking for it and they do not need it. money going to large businesses with mailing addresses in new york, chicago, and san francisco, not even to working families. finally, we need tax reform. that is fair, asking the wealthy to contribute their fair share. i support the agreement and i encourage my colleagues to do so as well. >> the gentleman from michigan, mr. levin. >> i now yield one minute to the distinguished chairman from tennessee. >> thank you. i have voted twice to raise the debt ceiling. in may, i voted with about 90 other people. i voted this past weekend for leader reid's program. i cannot vote for this program. the first series of cuts we know, the second we do not know. i fear is a toad -- a trojan horse. that is an odyssey and journey that this country should not have to traverse. this country has been taken to this point by a group of ideologues that do not like government, want to reduce it, are reducing it, want to hurt t
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)